Cal State East Bay News | CSUEB Magazine Online


 

For a number of years this was the Cal State East Bay Magazine's website where visitors could read about Campus News and download the CSUEB Magazine in pdf form.
Content is from the site's 2005 - 2006 archived page providing a glimpse of what this site offered its readership.

For the most up to date news bout Cal State East Bay go to their current website t; http://www.csueastbay.edu/index.html

CSUEB Magazine Online Circa 2006

Magazine Cover

Norma S. Rees leaves the university president's office after 16 years, and Mo Qayoumi is appointed her successor. Alumnus Caleb Cheung is named California's top science teacher, and the university delves into improving math and science education in our schools. Read all about it in the magazine for alumni and friends of California State University, East Bay.
 

Super Sunday

Super Sunday

More than a dozen Bay Area churches were the focus on 'Super Sunday,' June 11 as presidents of California State University campuses appeared in pulpits to urge closer partnerships to get more African Americans enrolled. At the Acts Full Gospel Church of God in Christ in Oakland (above) Cal State East Bay staff visiting with parishoners included biology professor Sue Opp, left, and enrollment services counselor Rosalyn Earl.

The New View

View Cover

Check out the new View for the latest news and information for Cal State East Bay faculty and staff. Read about student researchers, faculty grants and outstanding staff. Take the poll, place a free classified ad and test your Institutional Knowledge to win a fabulous prize. It's all there and more in your new online View.

 

Top Stories


News : Campus News
Faculty Excellence Endowment for Bus. and Econ.

Marvin Remmich, an East Bay businessman and university alumnus, has pledged a $100,000 "faculty excellence endowment" to the College of Business and Economics.

News : Concord Campus
Biotech Science Camp at Concord Campus
Local high school students aspiring to have careers in the sciences are exploring a full range of scientific topics while connecting with scientists between July 10 and 14 on Cal State East Bay's Concord Campus.

News : CSUEB in the News
New CSUEB President Lives Like a Freshman

Mo Qayoumi, the new president of Cal State East Bay, started his job July 1. Read here what the Daily Review and the other ANG (Alameda News Group) newspapers have reported.

News : CSUEB in the News
College President Feels Ties to Many

The new leader of Cal State East Bay has filled many roles and is an immigrant who is the first in his family to go to a university. Read the Contra Costa Times' feature on Mo Qayoumi right here.

News : Campus News
President Invites You to Imagine the Possibilities

Mo Qayoumi, who assumed the presidency of Cal State East Bay on July 1, has written an open letter to the university community about the possibilities he sees for the university. He encourages you to respond online and share your thoughts with him.

News : Art & Culture
3 Theater Productions Set for Summer at CSUEB
"Scapin, The Cheat," "Once Upon a Matress," and "Everlasting Arms" are slated for the 2006 Highlands Summer Theatre schedule on the Hayward campus of Cal State East Bay.

News : Campus News
MSW Program Awarded Accreditation
Cal State East Bay's Master's of Social Work Department has been awarded accreditation retroactive to the 2003-04 academic year. The accreditation is in force through 2010.

News : Campus News
Orientation Important for New Students

Summer is orientation time--and very helpful--for new students at California State University, East Bay.

News : Campus News
Wang Family Endows Professorship in CBE

Stanley T. and Franny Wang have created the Wang Family Professorship in Cal State East Bay's College of Business and Economics with their gift of a $250,000 endowment. It is the first endowed faculty honor in the history of the university.

News : Campus News
History Dept. Partners with ACOE to Train Teachers
Department faculty will be cooperating with the Alameda County Office of Education and the San Bruno Office for the National Archives to extend ACOE's "Words That Made America" history program with four school districts.

 



 

News: Name Change

It's Official: CSU Trustees Vote Unanimously To Change
University Name to 'Cal State East Bay'


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 2005

Contact: Kim Huggett, Dir. of Public Affairs, (510) 885-2032, or Barry Zepel, Office of Public Affairs, (510) 885-3884 Jan 28, 2005

The California State University Board of Trustees voted unanimously Wednesday (Jan. 26) to change the name of Cal State Hayward to California State University, East Bay, to reflect its status as a regional university.

The board is the state’s governing body for the 23-campus CSU system and its vote at 1:02 p.m. came on the recommendation of CSUH President Norma Rees, CSU Chancellor Charles Reed and a trustees committee that heard proponents and opponents make presentations one day earlier.

“Of the people we heard speak on both sides of this issue I found the students to be especially articulate and passionate,” said trustee Jeffrey Bleich. “I live in the East Bay, which is a well-known geographic area and has a strong and vibrant economy. This is a vote that won’t create divisions, but draw groups together and make us stronger.”

Trustee Melinda Guzman-Moore, who voted against the name change in committee the day before, announced she would change her vote to support the proposal after considering the arguments and deciding, “this is the best for the community and the region and will improve the profile of the city of Hayward and the university.”

“We have heard everything said and read all the e-mails and letters and the personal appeals made from both sides over the past three months,” said board Chair Murray Galinson. “This vote is in the best interest of the campus, but I encourage all of those who contacted us to stay aware and involved in the institution.”

Student trustee Eric Guerra, representing the California State Student Association, also voted for the name change. Guerra said he hopes the CSU system will continue to see “students as assets and allies.”

Applauding the decision, CSU Bakersfield President Horace Mitchell told the trustees that when he was an administrator at UC Berkeley he was aware of Cal State Hayward, “but it was clear to me at the time that it suffered from a definition that was far too narrow to describe the scope of the region it served.”

After the vote, President Rees said a team would be working with campus and community constituencies “to make the change as efficient and effective as possible.” Within hours of the board’s vote, the university had posted its new name on the home page of its Web site. Implementing other changes could take place over the next two years, Rees said.

On the day before the full board’s vote, the trustees’ Committee on Institutional Advancement voted 4-1 to endorse the name change. The decision came after an hour of presentations by proponents and opponents of the proposal. Those speaking in opposition included CSUH Associated Students Chair D. McKinney, who said more student input should have been sought, and Hayward Mayor Roberta Cooper, who said more research was necessary.

Those speaking on behalf of the name change proposal included CSUH students Krista Kohlberg and Masaho Ninoimiya, professor Julia Norton, university associate vice president James Kelly, and Oakland City Councilman Dick Spees.

Also speaking in support of the name change were Monica Pacheco and Deborah Taylor from the CSUH Alumni Association Board of Directors, which earlier voted 10-0 to endorse the proposal after 70,000 graduates were notified of the proposal in the November issue of their magazine. The alumni association board includes two former chairs of the Associated Students.

Chancellor Reed introduced the issue by noting that he had spent more than an hour in conversation with CSUH founding President Fred F. Harcleroad to understand the history behind the university’s name. He said Harcleroad told him that he had proposed the name ‘East Bay’ before the campus opened in 1959.

“Almost half a century later,” Harcleroad wrote in a letter distributed to the trustees’ committee members, “the university still serves the East Bay and the proposed fifth name change provides a name that describes realistically what has always been the true geographic mission of the institution.”

Rees explained to the committee that the name change proposal was an outgrowth of nearly two years of study to determine perceptions of the university from campus groups, alumni, prospective students and their parents, and community leaders throughout the East Bay. Those leaders included Concord Mayor Laura Hoffmeister, State Assemblymember Loni Hancock and State Senator Tom Torlakson, all who sent the chancellor letters endorsing the name change.

In a letter distributed to the board committee, Hancock wrote, “a more appropriate and inclusive name would increase regional awareness and visibility of the university and could potentially result in expanded donor support and recognition for the university’s two campuses.”

A theme of the proponents’ presentation was that the university has been undergoing a transformation to a regional institution that a name change would reflect.

“The name change formalizes this evolution…a renaissance, if you will,” Associate Vice President James Kelly told the committee. “Now is the time to declare who we are and what we stand for.”

The university has campuses in Hayward and Concord, a Professional Development and Conference Center and a Small Business Development Center in Oakland, teaching centers in Richmond and Union City, a degree completion program at Contra Costa College in San Pablo, and offers its Transnational Executive MBA program in San Ramon.

Last week, ChevronTexaco made a $1 million grant to help the university support development of a Small Business Development Center in Richmond.

Speakers noted last year’s accreditation of the CSUH engineering program in its first year of eligibility, selection as a “Best Western” university by The Princeton Review, and an increase of 30 percent in the number of first-time freshman as examples.

Tuesday’s committee vote had board members Herbert Carter, Carol Chandler, Debra Farar and Kathleen Kaiser voting to approve the name change and trustee Melinda Guzman-Moore voting against it.

Although not a voting member of the committee, trustee George Gowgani sat in on the discussion and invited all the participants, “to come back to her in five or six years to talk about how this was the best decision ever made in connection with this campus.”

President Rees announced her decision to propose a name change at the Oct. 6 meeting of the university’s Academic Senate. The Senate, which includes five students as well as non-teaching staff, voted 23-20-1 to not endorse the proposal.

President Rees told members of the CSU committee that in the 110 days since her name change proposal became public the news has been widely spread in the Bay Area news media, giving students, staff, faculty, alumni and community leaders an opportunity to send reactions to her office, CSU Chancellor Charles Reed and trustees. Recently, an interview with Rees on the name change was broadcast on all of Comcast Cable’s Local Edition programs on the CNN Headline News channel on 24 cable systems from Santa Rosa to San Jose, reaching a potential of 2.5 million households each time it aired.

President Rees conceded that Hayward’s daily newspaper, affiliated with the Alameda Newspapers Group, took an editorial position against the name change, but noted that more than a dozen newspapers covering many of the 32 other incorporated cities in Alameda and Contra Costa counties endorsed the proposal, including the Berkeley Voice, East Bay Business Times, Pleasanton Weekly, Livermore Independent, Antioch Ledger and the Contra Costa Times.

She quoted an editorial in the East Bay Business Times that said the new name would communicate that the university is “an educational powerhouse that could unify the region.”

President Rees has said it will take up to two years to fully implement the name change. For example, letterhead and business cards will be replaced as existing stocks are exhausted. She promised that state money will not be used for changing signage and said donors have already come forward offering to help.

The university published a list of frequently asked questions about the issue on its news site. More information is available at the “Name Change News” link on the university’s home page at csuhayward.edu.

Winter Edition 2006

Inside:

Testing the Waters

Tracking Genetic Trails

New Machine Boosts Science Learning

Banking on China

 



NEWS STORIES from 2006

 

News: Concord Campus

Cal State Concord Holds First Graduation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sara Steffens, CC Times Staff Writer

Jun 4, 2006

Clad in black caps and gowns and cheered on by a huge crowd of family and friends, 168 students on Saturday become the first to receive diplomas at the Concord campus of California State University East Bay.

Around 2,000 well-wishers gathered to watch the ceremony, held on an outlying athletic field surrounded by rolling hills and aging oaks.

"This is a celebration for all of us," Contra Costa County Supervisor Mark DeSaulnier told the graduates.

"It's the realization of the dream for you and your family, but it's also a celebration for the community as a whole, and of the people who wanted this campus to be here."

Peter Wilson, dean of the Concord campus, couldn't resist pulling a camera from his gown to photograph the crowd from the podium.

"I've always wanted to do that," he said.

Since its first commencement in 1961, more than 95,000 students have graduated from Cal State East Bay, formerly known as Cal State Hayward.

But until now, even those who took most or all of their classes in Concord had to travel to the main Hayward campus for commencement.

Norma Rees, president of Cal State East Bay, said this year's graduating class from both campuses mirrors a national shift in the composition of colleges. Perhaps most significantly, a majority are "nontraditional" students, with the bachelor's degree recipients averaging 31 years old, Rees said.

"Most of you have combined your studies with home, work and community responsibilities," she said.

More than two-thirds of this year's CSU East Bay graduates are women, 58 percent are people of color, and many speak English "as a second, third or fourth language," Rees said.

State transportation secretary Sunne Wright McPeak, who gave the commencement address, said those demographics underscore the importance of the Concord campus to Contra Costa County.

"It is clearly important to have access to higher education right here at home," she said. "And nothing is more important as an instrument of democracy than education."

McPeak, who was the first in her family to finish college, urged the graduates to find ways to contribute to their community.

"To me, having the opportunity to get a good education carries the responsibility to use it for the betterment of others," she said.

Despite minor organizational hitches that delayed the ceremony's start, many of Saturday's graduates said they were pleased to be able to get their diplomas in Concord, for both symbolic and practical reasons.

"I've taken only two classes in Hayward," said 26-year-old Jason McBurney of Antioch, who received a master's degree in business administration. "I'm a Concord student."

Besides, added his friend and fellow MBA Dave James, commuting to Hayward can take an hour and a half in traffic.

"This is smaller, it's nicer," said James, 30, of Concord.

For Marvin Urroz, the Concord ceremony meant being able to be cheered on by his wife, children and even a grandchild as he received his master's degree in social work.

"My family was able to attend, and we're close to home," said Urroz, 43, of Antioch. "Actually, if this place didn't exist, it would have been impossible for me to get my degree."

 

News: Art & Culture

 

Choral Concert to Benefit Gonzalez Scholarship

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A choral concert by the Saringhimig Singers on June 10 in the University Theatre is sponsored by the Center for Filipino Studies to benefit the NVM Gonzalez Scholarship Fund.

© Copyright California State University, East Bay

California State University, East Bay is the San Francisco East Bay Area’s regional public university of choice. It serves the region with two campuses, one in the Hayward Hills and the other in Concord, and a professional development center in downtown Oakland. With a growing enrollment approaching 14,000, Cal State East Bay attracts students from throughout the region and from more than 80 countries. The university supports the quest of students of all backgrounds to discover and develop their potential and career paths. It offers small classes, low fees, individualized instruction, and an emphasis on student academic and personal achievement. Cal State East Bay offers students a choice of more than 100 fields of study, including majors, minors and program options. It confers bachelor’s degrees and master’s degrees as well as a new Ed.D. in educational leadership offered in conjunction with U.C. Berkeley.

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Music Dept. to Present Operama May 31

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The annual Operama will feature staged and costumed opera arias and scenes featuring "The Magic Flute," "The Perfect Fool," and "The Barber of Seville" on the evening of May 31.

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Stone Soul Picnic at Ampitheatre May 29

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Michelle Heller, KBLX, (415) 284-1029

May 16, 2006

The Pioneer Amphitheatre at California State University, East Bay will open its summer music season at the Hayward campus with the ninth annual KBLX Stone Soul Picnic on Memorial Day, May 29.

The lineup for the daylong music festival includes five R&B; bands, including Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees The O'Jays and The Dells. Also appearing will be Bobby Womack, The Dramatics and The Whispers. Tickets are on sale at Tickets.com and all Tickets.com retail outlets.

The Pioneer Amphitheatre at 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd. in Hayward has a capacity of more than 7,000 spectators and became the new home for the KBLX Stone Soul Picnic in 2004. The event has always sold out.

On Memorial Day the gates will open at 10 a.m. and the show will run from noon to about 6 p.m. Tickets are $76.50 for reserved seating and $55 for general admission lawn seating, The cost of parking is included in the ticket price.

Cal State East Bay has ample parking as well as service from the Hayward BART station by AC Transit Line 92. No picnic coolers will be permitted, but food and drink will be available in the amphitheatre.

The lineup:

The O’Jays were at the forefront of Seventies soul music. Racking up a string of modern R&B; classics, including “Back Stabbers,” “Love Train,” “For the Love of Money,” “I Love Music” and “Use Ta Be My Girl,” they helped put the “Philly Soul” sound on the map.

Bobby Womack, known as ‘The Preacher,’ was mentored by Sam Cooke, and made the transition from gospel to soul music. “Woman’s Gotta Have It,” and “Lookin’ For Love” both reached No. 1 on Billboard’s singles charts. He has collaborated with such artists as Janis Joplin, Aretha Franklin, and Wilson Pickett.

The Dramatics are part of the lineage of black harmony groups and hail from the birthplace of rhythm and blues, Detroit, Michigan. Their hits include the No. 1 single “In the Rain,” and “Me And Mrs. Jones.”

The Whispers are one of the most enduring vocal groups of the last 40 years. ‘(Let’s Go) All The Way’ and ‘Rock Steady’ were hits for The Whispers and remain dance club standards.

The Dells’ were 2004 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees and their success started in 1956 with the No. 1 hit “Oh What A Night,” followed by another No. 1 single in 1968 with “Stay In My Corner.” Between 1956 and 1992, The Dells collected 46 rhythm and blues hits.

 

 

News: Athletics

Eagle D3 Independents 'Athlete of Month'

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: (For Media) Marty Valdez, Sports Information Dir., (510) 885-3528, or Barry Zepel, Media Relations Officer, (510) 885-3884

May 13, 2006

Craig EagleCraig Eagle, a pitcher for California State University, East Bay, was named Friday (May 12) as recipient of the Association of Division III Independents Male Student-Athlete of the Month for April.

Eagle, a junior geography major from San Diego, posted a 3-1 record with a 3.04 earned-run average during the month. In 23.1 innings pitched, Eagle recorded 21 strikeouts and five walks. In an 8-1 victory over Willamette University, Eagle allowed only one run and struck out six in seven innings of work.

The Association of Division III Independents consists of 19 NCAA Division III independent institutions that have joined together to recognize student-athletes at independent institutions, and to provide exempted postseason championship competition in nine sports in 2005-06.

The association recognizes outstanding athletic achievements of its student-athletes on a weekly, monthly and annual basis. The award recipients were selected after a vote of the Association’s Student-Athlete Recognition Committee.

Further information about the Association of Division III Independents is available online at http://www.d3independents.org.

 

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CSUEB Students Win 4 at Research Competition

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cal State East Bay students won four awards, including two for first place, at the annual CSU Research Competition held May 5 and 6 at CSU Channel Islands in Camarillo.

 

 

NEWS

News : Art & Culture
Apr 25, 2006
Lecture, Workshop on Dance and Disability

News : CSUEB in the News
Apr 24, 2006
Cal State's Rees Put Hayward Campus on Map

News : Campus News
Apr 20, 2006
Former President Ellis McCune Dies

News : Campus News
Apr 17, 2006
130 Employers to Recruit at Job Fair April 27

News : Campus News
Apr 17, 2006
Jane Lopus is 'Outstanding Professor' for 2005-06

News : Campus News
Apr 17, 2006
Economic Summit to Focus on Small Business

News : Art & Culture
Apr 17, 2006
Juried Student Art Exhibit Opens May 10

News : Art & Culture
Apr 17, 2006
Neil Simon's 'Fools' Next On Univ. Theatre Stage

News : Campus News
Apr 14, 2006
Welcome Day for New Students April 22

News : Art & Culture
Apr 14, 2006
Fusion Fest Presents Innovative Performances

News : Campus News
Apr 14, 2006
CSUEB to Host East Bay College Fair May 6

News : Art & Culture
Apr 13, 2006
Jewish Culture, History Series Resumes May 3

News : Art & Culture
Apr 13, 2006
Campus Arts Events Announced for Spring

News : Campus News
Apr 6, 2006
New Seal Communicates 'Regional Identity'

News : Concord Campus
Apr 5, 2006
Osher Foundation Awards $100,000 Grant to CSUEB

News : Campus News
Apr 4, 2006
SIFE Students Shine at Regional Competition

News : Campus News
Apr 1, 2006
'Soberfest' Rescheduled to May 24

News : Athletics
Mar 27, 2006
5 Athletes, Coach to be Inducted in Hall of Fame

News : Art & Culture
Mar 23, 2006
Stone Soul Picnic Comes to Ampitheatre May 29

News : Concord Campus
Mar 22, 2006
'Day of the Teacher' at Concord Campus April 29

News : Campus News
Mar 6, 2006
'Music Theatre' Is New Study Option at CSUEB

News : Concord Campus
Mar 2, 2006
Students Invited to Enter Essay Contest

News : Campus News
Mar 1, 2006
University Observes 'Women's Herstory Month'
[ Visit Website ]

News : Athletics
Feb 25, 2006
Sara Stas Honored by Div. III Independents

News : Campus News
Feb 24, 2006
Tim Smith Recognized As Top Music Educator

News : Art & Culture
Feb 10, 2006
Museum Features 'Immigrants All' Exhibit

News : Concord Campus
Feb 10, 2006
4-Year Nursing Degree to be Offered at Concord

News : Campus News
Feb 9, 2006
Three Commencement Ceremonies this June

News : Campus News
Jan 31, 2006
Record-Breaking Year for University Fundraising

News : Campus News
Jan 13, 2006
$1.7M Grant Expands Nursing Program

News : Campus News
Jan 13, 2006
EDAB Honors Rees With 2006 Vision Award

News : CSUEB in the News
Jan 13, 2006
Pioneers' Wood Sets Mark

News : Athletics
Jan 13, 2006
Women's Basketball, Water Polo Also Victorious

News : CSUEB in the News
Jan 13, 2006
Mike Wood Breaks School's Scoring Record

News : Campus News
Jan 4, 2006
Grad student wins teaching award
[ Visit Website ]

News : Campus News
Dec 22, 2005
'Poverty in America' Brings Awareness

News : Athletics
Dec 22, 2005
Iman Young Honored by Div. III Independents

News : Campus News
Dec 22, 2005
Gov's Budget Nixes Fee Hike
[ Visit Website ]

News : Campus News
Dec 19, 2005
Students Track Genetic Trails
[ Visit Website ]

News : Campus News
Dec 19, 2005
New Machine Boosts Science Learning

 


California State University, East Bay is the San Francisco East Bay Area’s regional public university of choice. It serves the region with two campuses, one in the Hayward Hills and the other in Concord, and a professional development center in downtown Oakland. With a growing enrollment approaching 14,000, Cal State East Bay attracts students from throughout the region and from more than 80 countries. The university supports the quest of students of all backgrounds to discover and develop their potential and career paths. It offers small classes, low fees, individualized instruction, and an emphasis on student academic and personal achievement. Cal State East Bay offers students a choice of more than 100 fields of study, including majors, minors and program options. It confers bachelor’s degrees and master’s degrees as well as a new Ed.D. in educational leadership offered in conjunction with U.C. Berkeley.

About CSUEB

Where all your possibilities come into view

 

California State University East Bay is known for award winning programs, expert instruction, small classes, a highly personalized learning environment—and a choice of more than 100 career-focused fields of study. With two scenic campuses—one in the Hayward Hills overlooking San Francisco Bay and the other in the Concord foothills of Mt. Diablo—plus a professional center in dynamic downtown Oakland, Cal State East Bay is where all your possibilities come into view.
 

 

Mission and Strategic Planning

Cal State East Bay’s strategic planning process is intended to lead to greater organizational effectiveness, better use of resources, and achievement of university goals and objectives. Through the use of evidence to inform decisions and assessment to evaluate the results of actions, Cal State East Bay will be able to guide its future with confidence.
 

Strategic Planning Process

The current strategic planning process began in 2005 with a highly participative process to develop a new list of University Goals and Objectives adopted in May 2006. In October 2006, University President Mo Qayoumi initiated a series of 21 Town Hall meetings across the entire University, which shaped the seven mandates in the University’s Framework for the Future.

In 2008, the University approved its new Academic Plan (pdf) and identified initial priorities for implementation. More specific academic, physical, and divisional plans continue to be developed to sustain support for the University’s mission and values into the future.

The Strategic Planning Summary, April 2008 (pdf) outlines the University’s strategic plans and priorities.
 

Strategic Planning Model

Cal State East Bay’s streamlined strategic planning model involves the following essential elements:

At California State University, East Bay, academic and enrollment planning drive support services, faculty and staff recruitment, budget development, information systems, physical planning, external relations, and fund raising, as illustrated by the above diagram. Academic planning in the first tier, reflects the mission of the University. Enrollment follows, with students at the center of the second tier, supported by academic and student services, and by the faculty and staff who offer these services. The third tier includes the underlying infrastructure. The University recognizes that many of the relationships shown by the directional arrows are reciprocal. For example, while students need instructors, services, and facilities; maintaining high quality, respected faculty, strong co-curricular programs, and a well-maintained campus can attract and retain students.
 

Strategic Planning Relationships

The administrative divisions of Cal State East Bay provide action plans and coordination of the strategic plan elements. The Seven Strategic Mandates Table (pdf) shows the divisions responsible for coordination of the seven mandates outlined in the Framework for the Future, and implementation relationships.

 

CalStateEastBayNews.com